146 Reasons Sugar is Ruining Your Health

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146 Reasons Why Sugar Is Ruining Your Health
Nancy Appleton, Ph.D.

I really enjoyed Nancy’s List of the effects sugar has on the body. Please read and enjoy!!

1.  Sugar can suppress the immune system.
2.  Sugar upsets the mineral relationships in the body.
3.  Sugar can cause hyperactivity, anxiety, difficulty concentrating, and crankiness in children.
4.  Sugar can produce a significant rise in triglycerides.
5.  Sugar contributes to the reduction in defense against bacterial infection (infectious diseases).
6.  Sugar causes a loss of tissue elasticity and function, the more sugar you eat the more elasticity     and function you lose.
7.  Sugar reduces high-density lipoproteins.
8.  Sugar leads to chromium deficiency.
9.  Sugar leads to cancer of the ovaries.
10. Sugar can increase fasting levels of glucose.
11. Sugar causes copper deficiency.
12. Sugar interferes with absorption of calcium and magnesium.
13. Sugar may make eyes more vulnerable to age-related macular degeneration.
14. Sugar raises the level of neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine.
15. Sugar can cause hypoglycemia.
16. Sugar can produce an acidic digestive tract.
17. Sugar can cause a rapid rise of adrenaline levels in children.
18. Sugar malabsorption is frequent in patients with functional bowel disease.
19. Sugar can cause premature aging.
20. Sugar can lead to alcoholism.
21. Sugar can cause tooth decay.
22. Sugar contributes to obesity
23. High intake of sugar increases the risk of Crohn’s disease, and ulcerative colitis.
24. Sugar can cause changes frequently found in person with gastric or duodenal ulcers.
25. Sugar can cause arthritis.
26. Sugar can cause asthma.
27. Sugar greatly assists the uncontrolled growth of Candida Albicans (yeast infections).
28. Sugar can cause gallstones.
29. Sugar can cause heart disease.
30. Sugar can cause appendicitis.
31. Sugar can cause hemorrhoids.
32. Sugar can cause varicose veins.
33. Sugar can elevate glucose and insulin responses in oral contraceptive users.
34. Sugar can lead to periodontal disease.
35. Sugar can contribute to osteoporosis.
36. Sugar contributes to saliva acidity.
37. Sugar can cause a decrease in insulin sensitivity.
38. Sugar can lower the amount of Vitamin E (alpha-Tocopherol) in the blood.
39. Sugar can decrease growth hormone.
40. Sugar can increase cholesterol.
41. Sugar can increase the systolic blood pressure.
42. High sugar intake increases advanced glycation end products (AGEs)(Sugar bound non-enzymatically to protein)
43. Sugar can interfere with the absorption of protein.
44. Sugar causes food allergies.
45. Sugar can contribute to diabetes.
46. Sugar can cause toxemia during pregnancy.
47. Sugar can contribute to eczema in children.
48. Sugar can cause cardiovascular disease.
49. Sugar can impair the structure of DNA
50. Sugar can change the structure of protein.
51. Sugar can make our skin age by changing the structure of collagen.
52. Sugar can cause cataracts.
53. Sugar can cause emphysema.
54. Sugar can cause atherosclerosis.
55. Sugar can promote an elevation of low-density lipoproteins (LDL).
56. High sugar intake can impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in the body.
57. Sugar lowers the enzymes ability to function.
58. Sugar intake is higher in people with Parkinson’s disease.
59. Sugar can increase the size of the liver by making the liver cells divide.
60. Sugar can increase the amount of liver fat.
61. Sugar can increase kidney size and produce pathological changes in the kidney.
62. Sugar can damage the pancreas.
63. Sugar can increase the body’s fluid retention.
64. Sugar is enemy #1 of the bowel movement.
65. Sugar can cause myopia (nearsightedness).
66. Sugar can compromise the lining of the capillaries.
67. Sugar can make the tendons more brittle.
68. Sugar can cause headaches, including migraine.
69. Sugar plays a role in pancreatic cancer in women.
70. Sugar can adversely affect school children’s grades and cause learning disorders.
71. Sugar can cause depression.
72. Sugar increases the risk of gastric cancer.
73. Sugar and cause dyspepsia (indigestion).
74. Sugar can increase your risk of getting gout.
75. Sugar can increase the levels of glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test over the ingestion of complex carbohydrates.
76. Sugar can increase the insulin responses in humans consuming high-sugar diets compared to low-sugar diets.
77. A diet high in refined sugar reduces learning capacity.
78. Sugar can cause less effective functioning of two blood proteins, albumin, and lipoproteins, which may reduce the body’s ability to handle fat and cholesterol.
79.  Sugar can contribute to Alzheimer’s disease.
80. Sugar can cause platelet adhesiveness.
81. Sugar can cause hormonal imbalance; some hormones become under active and others become overactive.
82. Sugar can lead to the formation of kidney stones.
83. Diets high in sugar can cause free radicals and oxidative stress.
84. High sugar diet can lead to biliary tract cancer.
85. High sugar consumption of pregnant adolescents is associated with a twofold-increased risk for delivering a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant.
86. High sugar consumption can lead to substantial decrease in gestation duration among adolescents.
87. Sugar slows food’s travel time through the gastrointestinal tract.
88. Sugar increases the concentration of bile acids in stools and bacterial enzymes in the colon. This can modify bile to produce cancer-causing compounds and colon cancer.
89.  Sugar increases estradiol (the most potent form of naturally occurring estrogen) in men.
90.  Sugar combines with and destroys phosphatase, an enzyme, which makes the process of digestion more difficult.
91.  Sugar can be a risk factor of gallbladder cancer.
92. Sugar is an addictive substance.
93. Sugar can be intoxicating, similar to alcohol.
94. Sugar can exacerbate PMS.
95. Sugar given to premature babies can affect the amount of carbon dioxide they produce.
96. Decrease in sugar intake can increase emotional stability.
97. The rapid absorption of sugar promotes excessive food intake in obese subjects.
98. Sugar can worsen the symptoms of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
99. Sugar adversely affects urinary electrolyte composition.
100. Sugar can slow down the ability of the adrenal glands to function.
101. I.Vs (intravenous feedings) of sugar water can cut off oxygen to the brain.
102. High sucrose intake could be an important risk factor in lung cancer.
103. Sugar increases the risk of polio.
104. High sugar intake can cause epileptic seizures.
105. Sugar causes high blood pressure in obese people.
106. In Intensive Care Units, limiting sugar saves lives.
107. Sugar may induce cell death.
108. Sugar can increase the amount of food that you eat.
109. In juvenile rehabilitation camps, when children were put on a low sugar diet, there was a 44% drop in antisocial behavior.
110.  Sugar can lead to prostate cancer.
111. Sugar dehydrates newborns.
112.  Sugar can cause low birth weight babies.
113. Greater consumption of refined sugar is associated with a worse outcome of schizophrenia
114. Sugar can raise homocysteine levels in the blood stream.
115. Sweet food items increase the risk of breast cancer.
116. Sugar is a risk factor in cancer of the small intestine.
117. Sugar may cause laryngeal cancer.
118. Sugar induces salt and water retention.
119. Sugar may contribute to mild memory loss.
120. The more sodas a 10 year old child consumes, the less milk.
121. Sugar can increase the total amount of food consumed.
122. Exposing a newborn to sugar results in a heightened preference for sucrose relative to water at 6 months and 2 years of age.
123.  Sugar causes constipation.
124.  Sugar causes varicose veins.
125.  Sugar can cause brain decay in prediabetic and diabetic women.
126.  Sugar can increase the risk of stomach cancer.
127.  Sugar can cause metabolic syndrome.
128.  Sugar ingestion by pregnant women increases neural tube defects in embryos.
129.  Sugar can be a factor in asthma.
130.  The higher the sugar consumption the more chances of getting irritable bowel syndrome.
131.  Sugar can affect the brain’s ability to deal with rewards and consequences.
132.  Sugar can cause cancer of the rectum.
133.  Sugar can cause endometrial cancer.
134.  Sugar can cause renal (kidney) cell carcinoma.
135.  Sugar can cause liver tumors.
136.   Sugar can increase inflammatory markers in the blood stream of overweight people.
137. Sugar can lower Vitamin E levels in the blood stream.
138. Sugar can increase your appetite for all food.
139. Sugar plays a role in the etiology and the continuation of acne.
140. Too much sugar can kill your sex life.
141. Sugar saps school performance in children.
142. Sugar can cause fatigue, moodiness, nervousness and depression.
143.   Sugar is common choice of obese individuals.
144.   A linear decrease in the intake of many essential nutrients is associated with increasing total sugar intake.
145. High fructose consumption has been linked to liver disease.
146. Sugar adds to the risk of bladder cancer.

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16. Ibid.
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18. Ibid.
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63. Ibid.
64. Ibid.
65. Ibid.
66. Ibid.
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81. Ibid.
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86.  Ibid.
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88.  Ibid.
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90.  Lee, A. T. and Cerami A. “The Role of Glycation in Aging.” Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1992; 663:63-70.
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93. Ibid.
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124. op. cit.
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126. Chatenoud, Liliane et al. “Refined-cereal Intake and Risk of Selected Cancers in Italy.” Am. J. Clin Nutr.  Dec 1999;70:1107-1110.
127. Yoo, S. et al. “Comparison of Dietary Intakes Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk Factors in Young Adults: the Bogalusa Heart Study” Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):841-848.
128. Shaw, Gary M. et al. “Neural Tube Defects Associated with Maternal Periconceptional Dietary Intake of Simple Sugars and Glycemic Index.”
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129. Krilanovich, Nicholas J. “Fructose Misuse, the Obesity Epidemic, the Special Problems of the Child, and a Call to Action “ Am. J. Clin Nutr. Nov 2004;80:1446-1447.
130. .Jarnerot, G., “Consumption of Refined Sugar by Patients with Crohn’s Disease, Ulcerative colitis, or Irritable Bowel Syndrome.”  Scand J Gastroenterol. 1983 Nov;18(8):999-1002.
131. Allen, S. “Sugars and Fats: The Neurobiology of Preference.” Am J Nutr.
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132. De Stefani E, et al. “Sucrose as a Risk Factor for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum: a Case-control Study in Uruguay.” Int J Cancer. 1998 Jan 5;75(1):40-4.
133. Levi F, et al.  “Dietary Factors and the Risk of Endometrial Cancer.” Cancer. 1993 Jun 1;71(11):3575-3581.
134. Mellemgaard A. et al. “Dietary Risk Factors for Renal Cell Carcinoma in Denmark.” Eur J Cancer. Apr 1996;32A(4):673-82.
135. Rogers AE, et al.  “Nutritional and Dietary Influences on Liver Tumorigenesis in Mice and Rats.”  Arch Toxicol Suppl. 1987;10:231-43. Review.
136. Sørensen L.B., et al. “Effect of Sucrose on Inflammatory Markers in Overweight Humans” Am J Clin Nutr. Aug 2005; 82(2)
137. Mohanty, Priya, et.al. “Glucose Challenge Stimulates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generation by Leucocytes,” J Clin Endocrinol Metabol.. 2000, Aug:85(8) 2970-2973.
138. Arumugam V, et al. “A High-Glycemic Meal Pattern Elicited Increased Subjective Appetite Sensations in Overweight and Obese Women.” Appetite. 2007; [Epub ahead of print].
139. Smith RN et al. “The Effect of a High-protein, Low Glycemic-load Diet Versus a Conventional, High Glycemic-load Diet on Biochemical Parameters Associated with Acne Vulgaris: A Randomized, Investigator-masked, Controlled Trial.” J Am Acad Dermatol 2007;57:247-256.
140. Selva, D.M., et al. “Monosaccharide-Induced Lipogenesis Regulates the Human Hepatic Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin Gene.” J. Clin. Invest. 2007. doi:10.1172/JCI32249.
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142.  Krietsch, K., et al. “Prevalence, Presenting Symptoms, and Psychological Characteristics of Individuals Experiencing a Diet-related Mood-disturbance.” Behavior Therapy. 1988;19(4): 593-604.

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RBTI: A Few Rules by Brixman

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Taboo Foods

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Taboo and Use Sparingly Foods List

  1. PROCESSED ORIENTAL TEAS-such as Lipton, Nestea, Earl of Gray, Orange Pekoe, etc.  Substitute with herbal teas (chamomile, mint, cinnamon, etc.) instead.  Dr. Reams says that more damage has been done to human health by consuming processed oriental teas than all the food preservatives ever used.
  2. WHITE FLOUR products, because what mineral they had, has been refined out.
  3. WHITE POTATOES (Idaho, Russet, Maine, etc.) should be limited to once per month. White Potatoes have no real mineral reserve to offer and they spike blood sugar very quickly in most people.  If it weren’t for the toppings, butter & sour cream etc., they have very little flavor as well. Stick with the colored potatoes in general.
  4. WHITE RICE and anything made from it.  Use whole grain or parboiled rice instead.  If white rice must be used, Uncle Ben’s Converted Rice is the style of choice. Add a 1/2 tsp. of black strap molasses to add to the mineral content.
  5. HOMOGENIZED MILK, because the body cannot pick up the calcium as easily when the fat is forced around the milk molecule.  There is a lot of debate about milk and milk products all over the place.  Milk is a fine food for a weak digestion as long as the fat is skimmed off of it and it comes from healthy sources. 6 oz. a day of good milk never hurt nobody.  It also offers a good source of calcium phosphate.
  6. COFFEE, because it upsets the stomach, unnaturally stimulates the adrenal and related glands, aggravates high blood pressure, over-stimulates the heart, and interferes with the natural biorhythm of the body. One cup per day of very weak coffee is acceptable for most people 30 years old or older since it works as a diuretic, but it can be problematic for those with low sugars.  Heavy coffee drinkers (more than 12 cups per day) should taper off slowly for several days until reaching the one cup per day allotment or it can be eliminated altogether if there is no special need for it.
  7. SEA SALT (all brands!).  This is the saltiest of salts and will cause the conductivity to go too high.  Sea Salt is known to be the #1 cause of xerostomia in the RBTI world.
  8. TABLE SALT  Use Lowery’s MSG Free Seasoning Salt instead and use it sparingly.  Depending on your salt level, you may be able to use more salt than the next guy.  Go by the numbers!
  9. WHITE SUGAR and anything made from it including candy, cookies, cakes, cereals, ice cream, etc.  The human body can safely metabolize and utilize 2 lb of white sugar per year.  Since white sugar of some sort is hidden in all kinds of processed food, it is better to just avoid using it as much as possible.  There are many other kinds of sweeteners available to choose from and variety is key to a long, happy, healthy life!
  10. COCOA / CHOCOLATE tends to constrict the kidneys & contains caffeine that is too stimulating for most chemistries. Carob may be substituted safely in some chemistries, but not for others. Carob may tend to plug up already constricted kidneys.
  11. BLACK PEPPER & NUTMEG are irritating to the colon.  No matter how fine the black pepper & nutmeg are ground, the edges of each particle remain sharp and will “cut” the intestinal wall on their way through. Someone that has a very healthy colon will not tend to be aggravated by this sharp cutting action.
  12. NUTS & NUT BUTTERS.  Go easy on these.  Although they are high in mineral, most people have difficulty digesting them.  Making nut milks is, however, an acceptable way of using nuts in one’s diet.  Also, boiling nuts, so that they become very soft, is another way that makes them acceptable.  Boiling them is a way of predigesting them so your digestion doesn’t become stressed and overworked.
  13. CHEESE – We were taught to use cheese “to taste.”  Cheese is a heavy food and difficult to digest for many people.  It also contains a lot of fat.  It is suggested that no more than 1/2 ounce per 25 pounds of body weight per WEEK be consumed. Example: A person weighs 150 pounds – 150 / 25 = 6 x 1/2 = 3 ounces of cheese per WEEK.  It is best to use a hard cheese such as cheddar which has been aged at least one year.  If you have a high urine pH, it is best to avoid cheese altogether since it is constipating and slows the system even more.
  14. WHEAT BREAD – Dr. Reams said the more bread one eats per day the less mineral one will get from the other foods eaten.  It is easy to fill up on bread because it is easy to use and tastes good.  But when you do this, you miss out on valuable minerals and enzymes available from other food sources. I suggested half a slice of bread per day for every 50 pounds of body weight.  Toast it if possible for the best digestibility.  If eating other wheat-based foods for breakfast, such as pancakes, muffins, bagels, etc. make sure you calculate these into your daily allotment of bread for the day.
  15. ALL RAW FOODS are too cleansing on the system and are harder to digest than cooked foods.  Foods cooked in a healthy way are predigested for your system and will therefore give up their minerals easier.  Have a raw salad before lunch & dinner, a few pieces of raw food as decorations on your plate, and some raw fruit first thing in the morning.  As your body becomes healthier, your digestive system will become stronger and you will be able to increase your raw food intake accordingly.
  16. UNCLEAN MEATS: (any animal that does not have a cloven hoof & chew it’s cud): rattlesnake, opossum, rabbit, bear, pork, etc., or any of its products: ham, ribs, bacon, sausage, chops, jowls, cracklings, chitterlings, or anything that contains the fat or lard, including processed pies, cakes, and pastries.  UNCLEAN SEAFOODS (fish or crustacean animals that have neither fins or scales): catfish, shrimp, lobster, frogs, turtle, snake, eel, lizard, catfish, tuna, etc.  UNCLEAN BIRDS & INSECTS (as listed in the Bible).  The unclean foods, not matter which one, release their energy too quickly in the body.  In essence they cause you to grow old too fast.  Anyone utilizing the U/S A will notice a loss of energy anytime one of these foods are eaten.  This loss of energy takes 7 days to return to normal.

Health IS a Lifestyle

As you begin removing these foods from your diet a whole new view of life will begin to form.  You will notice more energy, more joy, more time in the day, less digestive difficulties, less pain, less headaches.  Your lifestyle will begin to follow your healthier choices in food.

To find out more about RBTI and the U/S A, check out this article.

Or sign up to become a client (the 1st apt. is always free!).

 

U/S A Defined

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PH = 1.5 6.4/6.4 6-7C .04M 3/3 + CS

 Dr. Carey Reams (1905-1984) was a man before his time.  He was a very successful agronomist, inventor,  agricultural engineer, Naturopath, and an MD.  He was an acquaintance to Einstein. He fought in the 2nd world war and became paralyzed from the waist down, lost an eye, and had almost 200 pieces of shrapnel in his body at the same time.  He was a survivor and he loved to teach other people how to survive as well!

Einstein figured out E=MC2

Reams figured out PH=1.5 6.4/6.4 6-7C .04M 3/3+CS

Einstein and Reams were in conversation one day. Einstein told Reams, “I figured out how to take things apart, it’s your job to figure out how to put them together!” 

That’s exactly what Reams did.  He discovered that our bodies are taken apart and put together again through the process of ionization.  Just like chrome plating, gold plating, nickel plating, etc. our bodies are basically plated together, one molecule on top of another until a form is created.  In the same way we are taken apart one molecule at a time.  We become ill when this putting together and taking apart is not in sync due to a mineral deficiency.  Therefore all disease could be considered a mineral deficiency no matter how it shows up or what symptoms come with it.

In the formula above:

  • PH stands for Perfect Health
  • 1.5 is the urine Brix
  • 6.4/6.4 is the urine pH and saliva pH
  • 6-7C is the amount of all salts in your urine
  • .04M is the amount of debris in the urine
  • 3/3 is the nitrate and ammonial nitrogen in your urine
  • CS stands for Common Sense

Due to a brilliant mind and a boy dying from seizures, this formula came into being. From 1934 until now the numbers have not steered anybody wrong. It’s amazing to think that the medical sciences could have had this information, but they refused to accept it. Reams tried to give it to the AMA for 10+ years and they refused him.  Now it is up to us to use this formula to create our own perfect health.

How to do a U/S A

Each person must run the U/S A on their own urine and saliva.  Once a test is completed, the numbers may be given to a knowledgeable coach who will then instruct you in what they would do if those numbers were their own.  Once you know how to decide your own diet from the numbers, then you can branch out on your own.

To run a test you need a refractometer, pH strips or reagents, conductivity meter, a flashlight, and nitrogen reagents plus a few more items to do the tests.

After the basics of running a test have been learned from a trained professional it will take practice to get the test time down to about 10 minutes.

10 minutes is all it takes to get on the right track to a healthy lifestyle!

So, what do the results of the test show? There are 2300 to the 2300th power of possible problems. That’s a lot of information contained within the limits of this mathematical line. In other words, a mineral deficiency could show up in a different way in every person on this earth, plus more. So, I’ll keep it simple. The results of this test show:

  1. Sugars-Brix
    1. Total dissolved solids in the urine
    2. Insulin strength or weakness (blood sugar levels)
    3. Total energy available for healing as well as daily tasks
    4. Tendency toward sudden dropping sugar-possible blackout
    5. Alcohol levels (From Pancreas)
    6. Oxygen availability
  2. pH of Urine
    1. Calcium balance-whether anionic or cationic calciums
    2. Speed of digestion
    3. Condition of colon
    4. Total resistance/Magnetism
    5. Electrical Flow
    6. Likelihood of Parasite, Bacteria, Virus, or Fungus
    7. Type of exercise needed-Aerobic or Resistance
    8. Vitamin C levels
  3. pH of Saliva
    1. Liver Bile strength
    2. Likelihood of digestive difficulty
    3. Overall direction of resistance
  4. Salts-Conductivity
    1. Cholesterol buildup
    2. Electrical Pressure/Conductance
    3. Osmotic flow
    4. Fluid viscosity
    5. Agglutination
    6. Tissue breakdown & Crystallization
    7. Metabolic & Neurologic Reactions
    8. Water drinking habits
  5. Cell Debris-Albumin
    1. Kidney function
    2. Cellular exchange rate
    3. Water drinking habits
  6. Urea = Nitrate Nitrogen + Ammonial Nitrogen
    1. Heart Stress levels
    2. Brain organ communication
    3. Nitrogen levels
    4. Potassium deficiency
    5. Levels of soluble & insoluble Urea
    6. Protein digestion/ingestion
    7. Level of “tiredness”
    8. Water drinking habits
    9. Necessity of rest

Putting it all together

After looking at all this information, you may be wondering how this could be helpful.

Knowing the above information and putting all the answers together, a diet & lifestyle regime can be put together for you based on your own biological needs when the test was taken. Your results are going to be individual to you and nobody else. Someone else that ate the same exact diet as you might end up mineral deficient and start showing symptoms. That’s what is so wonderful about the U/S A, it is individualized to everyone’s own biological uniqueness!

Here’s a sample
of some dietary & lifestyle information that could be something you’d hear after you run a test.

  • For a high sugar, but not too high
    • No starches, carbohydrates, or sweets after 2PM
    • Drink comfrey or alfalfa tea
    • Limit fruit intake to breakfast only
  • For a urine pH under 6.4
    • Vit D is a necessity the lower it goes
    • Vit C will not be accepted by the body except as onion soup
    • Cationic calciums are over-abundant
    • Anionic calciums are in short supply
    • Increasing likelihood of virus & fungus infestation
  • For a saliva pH under 6.4
    • Digestion needs help
    • Grape Juice/egg cocktail would be very helpful
    • B12 is deficient
    • Foods must be easy to digest (mostly cooked or juiced)
  • For a salts reading above 15
    • Water needs to be drank every ½ hour depending on your brix
    • Salt needs to be eliminated temporarily
  • For a cell debris of 4M
    • Vit E needs to be included to help remove excess debris from system
    • Water/liquids need to be taken according to body weight
  • For a urea below 12
    • Potassium foods need to be increased
    • Rest may be necessary
    • Thoughts may be a bit scattered

Along with these things, this test shows whether your body, mind, and spirit are in rhythm with each other through successive testing. It also shows allergies (sensitivities) to carbohydrates through successive testing. There’s a lot more that this test reveals about you, but that’s for another time. For now, suffice it to say that there’s not much you can hide from a U/S A.

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Further reading:

Disclaimer: I am not a Medical Doctor, nor do I claim to be one. Therefore, this information is not intended for diagnosis or treatment or prevention of any disease and/or other medical condition. This information is for alternative dietary purposes only.

Know Your Health with U/S A! part 1

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U/S A (Urine/Saliva Anaylsis) part 1

Common Sense + 1.5  6.4/6.4  6-7C  .04M  3/3 = Perfect Health

 Utilizing the RBTI to create a Healthy Lifestyle will allow you to build a solid foundation for your health by looking at 7 parameters.  Within these parameters is seen a picture of the workings going on inside of your own body.  Not every aspect of the numbers needs to be understood by everyone attempting to let the RBTI knowledge lead them to better health.  For a complete understanding, please contact your RBTI consultant or use the contact us page to ask me any questions you might have that I have not already answered within this website. Don’t forget to check the FAQ page.

 There are a few very important points to remember about the Reams Biological Theory of Ionization:

  1.   All of the credit for the discovery and success of the RBTI goes to the God of creation. He is the God of mathematics, creating everything which was created through the expression of mathematics.
  2.  It is the only method that expresses the complexities of human biological life in mathematical terms.
  3.  All of the readings vary independently of each other, yet none of them are perfect unless ALL of the numbers are perfect.
  4.  The numbers show the results of nothing more than mineral deficiencies,  all disease is the result of a mineral deficiency, therefore if the numbers are perfect-minerals are not deficient, illness is not manifesting itself, and the body is able to repair itself.
  5.  The RBTI is based on the premise that we live off the energy created from the food we digest. Fix the digestion (which starts in the liver) and you have prepared for yourself a foundation upon which to build a very healthy house!

Common Sense:

The first and most important part of the entire equation is common sense.  Most of us already know that many of our habits could have a detrimental effect. Smoking, drinking, and drugs are probably the most obvious, but other habits such as staying up late, watching too much TV, not spending enough time outdoors, worry, anger, etc. also have a detrimental effect.  Something some of you may not realize is that a very limited diet is also just as dangerous. 

Do you unknowingly live with a limited diet?

Have you ever wondered what the common denominator of family history is?  Why do illnesses follow a family line?  From an RBTI perspective, it is because we eat what our parents ate, and they ate what their parents ate, etc.  What this means is we have probably limited our diet from a hereditary standpoint so we become ill from a hereditary standpoint. 

Common sense has a large role to play in creating a healthy foundation for the rest of your life. Look back into your family’s past and see if you can notice similarities and differences that you can use to propel you in making smart choices for your future.

1.5 Percent Sucrose, Degrees Brix Refractometer°Brix: Measured with a refractometer as seen here.

Utilizing the urine sample we measure the °brix to find out the level of carbohydrates that are being thrown off in your urine.  This tells you a few things about how your body is utilizing all sugars.

First, if the number is very low (from 0 – 1.2) you would expect to be experiencing hypoglycemic-like (low blood sugar) symptoms, as your pancreas is “dumping” too much insulin or you are not ingesting enough carbohydrate.

Second, if the number is very high (above 5.5) you may be experiencing diabetic-like (high blood sugar) symptoms, and your pancreas is not able to create enough insulin to keep up with the amount of carbohydrates ingested or the pancreas is not producing much insulin at all.

Third, if the reading is between 2 and 5.49 (known as the “Zone of Misery), your blood sugar level could drop at any time into the low blood sugar range.

Finally, if your urine carbohydrates are reading between 1.2 and 2.0 °brix then you are doing good. This is where your sugars reading needs to remain throughout the entire healing process.  Once your body’s mineral balance is stabilized and the rest of the numbers remain in the best range long enough, the sugars reading should stabilize at 1.5 °brix regardless of what you eat (assuming good eating habits for the most part-common sense again).

One caveat about urine °Brix as measured on a 0-10 or 1-32 refractometer: Salts are also a dissolved solid that can & will be picked up by a refractometer if the level of salts in your system is high enough.  This is why we need all the numbers in order to know what is needed in regards to a correct diet.

Stay tuned for part 2: Urine/Saliva pH measurement. 6.4/6.4

LUNCH – A Kings Delight

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Have a salad for lunch!LUNCH should be the largest meal of the day. Start off with a large salad, then add several steamed vegetables or a vegetable casserole, a fish, poultry, beef, or wild game dish, along with some type of grain or some bread, finish up with some fruit, cranberry juice, milk, yogurt, etc depending upon your personal chemistry. If meat is to be eaten, eat it at the lunch meal.

The following are suggestions for lunch:

  • LARGE FRESH VEGETABLE SALAD with a tablespoon of Olive Oil on it. Use 1 teaspoon of Olive Oil for every 50 pounds of body weight. Use salad dressings as desired. Make salads with a variety of leafy lettuces (California mix, Romaine, Boston, some Iceberg, Endive, Escarole) and lots of raw vegetables (carrots, peppers, radishes, tomatoes, cucumbers, regular and green onions, spinach leaves, bean sprouts, etc.) and condiments like olives, baby corn, artichoke hearts, etc. Like eating fresh fruit before the rest of breakfast was eaten, it is best that the salad be eaten before the rest of the lunch meal. The reason for this is so the body can extract the gelatin from the raw food which will aid in the digestion of the rest of the lunch entrees. It will also help prevent overeating.
  • 2 – 3 STEAMED VEGETABLES & some sort of GRAIN such as rice, millet, bulgur wheat, barley, etc. or
  • A VEGETABLE CASSEROLE made with at least 2 – 3 vegetables. Have a grain as described above if it is not in the casserole. Vegetarian based casseroles are delicious ways to make vegetables so that everyone eating will enjoy them. Any good vegetarian cookbook should have many recipes to choose from, or visit www.healthisalifestyle.info/recipes
  • A SANDWICH made with whole grain bread (if not grain intolerant). If you would like a quick sandwich when bread is not an option, roll your sandwich ingredients in a leaf of lettuce. Vegetarian sandwiches can be made using raw veggies, beans and bean spreads, nut butters (go easy on these though), prepared soy meats found in most supermarkets nowadays, etc. If meat is desired to use in your sandwiches (beef, poultry, fish, etc.) please read the note on meats in your personal recommendations diet guide.

Lunch should give you the energy you need to make it until supper comfortably. If you tend to have a low blood sugar, make sure to add a dessert to your lunch menu. Dessert should not be too sweet. A homemade apple pie without the extra sugar, a piece of fruit, or a nice cookie should do the trick. Remember if you have a tendency to low sugar that fruit should be eaten periodically throughout the day. If you have a tendency to a higher sugar, but not too high, starches and carbohydrates should not be eaten after 2 PM. This is to allow your body to naturally use up the energy in these foods before it’s time to retire for the night.

 

BREAKFAST – Normal Diet – For a Queen

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BREAKFAST can be very small, such as a piece of fruit, to having a bowl of fruit, to having whole grain cooked cereals, pancakes, toast, dry (but soaked!) cereals, eggs, etc. This is something you will have to experiment with yourself. The suggestions below should be based upon true hunger, not just because it is time to eat. Please recognize to learn the difference. I find myself not always requiring a hearty breakfast, other times I feel as if I could eat the whole house. You will be different depending on age, occupation, body chemistry, lifestyle, etc. If you are not hungry, then is better to not eat very much! However, if you are very hungry, consider the following:

FRUIT – Try to eat a different kind of fruit each day of the month. Use especially in season, locally grown fruit. Mango, pineapple, coconut, papaya, and avocado are especially nutritious. Consider making fruit salads using several different kinds of fruits. Delicious fruit drinks using all the fruit can be made using a Vita-Mix or other high speed blender. Creativity should be used to prepare delicious fruit compliments and entrees to the grains eaten for breakfast. Fruit should be eaten before the rest of your meal.

COOKED CEREALS – such as Oatmeal, Millet, Roman Meal, Cream of Rye, Cream of Wheat, Cream of Rice, Hominy Grits, etc. are possible choices. These can be made in many different ways instead of just plain. You may add different sweeteners, dried fruits, maybe some nuts, oil, etc. to increase the mineral content of the grains and make them more nutritious and really tasty.

DRY CEREALS – such as Grape Nuts, Rolled Oats, Corn Flakes, Shredded Wheat, Granola, Muesli, etc. are possible choices. Purchase the brands that do not use white sugar in their processing. Dry cereals should be soaked well for best digestibility. Try not to eat dry cereals more than once per week. It is easy to fall into a pattern of corn flakes everyday for breakfast since it is so simple. Remember, variety is the spice of life! Therefore, avoid getting trapped into the dry cereal everyday routine.

WHOLE GRAIN – Toast, Biscuits, Muffins, Pancakes, French Toast, Breakfast Bars(homemade), etc. Learn to make these for oneself if there is time. If not, supermarkets are carrying more varieties of whole grain breads, various whole grain flour mixes, etc. Health food stores and specialty type stores like Trader Joe’s also have these made from rice, millet, barley, etc. Jams and jellies may also be used. Many of these do not use white sugar (sucrose) anymore and can be better for some people than brands that do use sucrose.

EGGS – can be eaten once or twice per week and prepared anyway they are liked. If possible, one should obtain eggs from sources where the chickens are raised healthily and humanely.

MEAT – Regarding soy meat, try the Morningstar brand of soy sausage and soy bacon. It is surprising just how closely it tastes to the real thing! After a while, many people like them better than the energy depleting pork sources.

DRINK – fruit juices and/or skim milk if desired.

 

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